Giant Mushroom-like Neglected Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Shoulder with Spontaneous Bleeding: A Successful Surgical Approach

  • Nikhil Oliveira Onkoderma - Clinic for Dermatology, Venereology and Dermatologic Surgery, Sofia, Bulgaria
  • Georgi Tchernev Onkoderma - Clinic for Dermatology, Venereology and Dermatologic Surgery, Sofia, Bulgaria
  • Lorraine Joseph Kandathil Onkoderma - Clinic for Dermatology, Venereology and Dermatologic Surgery, Sofia, Bulgaria

Keywords

Mushroom-like growth, basal cell carcinoma, skin tumours, cutaneous surgery, spontaneous haemorrhaging

Abstract

Introduction: Giant basal cell carcinomas (GBCCs) are extremely rare and typically more aggressive than their predecessor subtype. GBCCs with mushroom-like morphology have rarely been reported, with only one other case identified in the literature. Here we present a unique case of a neglected giant mushroom-like BCC that was treated successfully.

Case description: An 81-year-old male patient presented with a large ulcerative mass on his back. He had a medical history of chronic heart failure and atrial fibrillation, which were controlled with heart medication. During a routine visit to change the dressing of the lesion, the central pedunculated stalk underwent spontaneous haemorrhaging which led to massive blood loss. The patient was treated for shock and the lesion was completely excised under emergency surgery. The tumour was sent for histopathological assessment after complete surgical removal. Recovery was successful with good postoperative results and no recurrence was reported in the 12 months following discharge.

Discussion: The patient was under long-standing anticoagulant therapy that contributed to the untimely rupture of the pedunculated lesion and led to spontaneous heavy haemorrhaging. Treatment for such giant lesions can be complex, especially in patients with co-morbid conditions. Careful assessment and early treatment are paramount for successful results.

Conclusion: Complete removal of such lesions is very successful for treating GBCCs.

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  • Published: 2021-12-22

    Issue: 2021: Vol 8 No 12 (view)

    Section: Articles

    How to cite:
    1.
    Oliveira N, Tchernev G, Kandathil LJ. Giant Mushroom-like Neglected Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Shoulder with Spontaneous Bleeding: A Successful Surgical Approach. EJCRIM 2021;8 doi:10.12890/2021_003089.