Acute Confusional State Revealing Moyamoya Disease in the Emergency Department: A Rare Entity

  • Javier Guerrero-Niño Emergency Unit Department, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France
  • Sarah Uge-Ginsberg Emergency Unit Department, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France
  • Pierre Marcueyz Emergency Unit Department, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France
  • Pierrick Le Borgne Emergency Unit Department, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France
  • Xavier Jannot Service de Médecine Interne, Diabète et Maladies Métaboliques, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France
  • Noel Lorenzo-Villalba Service de Médecine Interne, Diabète et Maladies Métaboliques, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France

Keywords

Confusional state, magnetic resonance imaging, moyamoya disease

Abstract

A 54-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department for an acute, fluctuating altered mental status and reduced perceptual awareness of her surroundings as well as disorganized thinking. Blood tests, including for drugs, were normal. A CT scan of the brain was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging and CT angiography of the supra-aortic vessels were both were consistent with moyamoya disease. The patient was hospitalized for further investigations.

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  • Published: 2021-03-17

    Issue: 2021: Vol 8 No 3 (view)

    Section: Articles

    How to cite:
    1.
    Guerrero-Niño J, Uge-Ginsberg S, Marcueyz P, Le Borgne P, Jannot X, Lorenzo-Villalba N. Acute Confusional State Revealing Moyamoya Disease in the Emergency Department: A Rare Entity. EJCRIM 2021;8 doi:10.12890/2021_002431.

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