Neglected Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Sickle Cell Anaemia during Prenatal Care

  • Minoodokht Bavarsad Karimi Department of Gynecology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Keywords

Pregnancy, pulmonary hypertension, sickle cell anaemia, prenatal care

Abstract

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is one of the main complications of sickle cell disease (SCD) and imparts significant risk during pregnancy. Here, we report the outcome of undetected PAH in a pregnant woman with SCD. The patient presented with severe progressive dyspnoea with echocardiographic findings of high pressure in the pulmonary artery in the 37th week of pregnancy. Despite an emergency caesarean section, both mother and neonate died. Regular cardiovascular check-up is essential for SCD patients and careful prenatal care should include cardiovascular evaluation. PAH during pregnancy is associated with high mortality and morbidity. As there is no proof that new advanced therapies decrease the risks, early diagnosis in pregnant patients with underlying disease, like sickle cell anaemia, is essential and termination of pregnancy should be considered.

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  • Published: 2020-04-08

    Issue: Vol 7 No 6 (view)

    Section: Articles

    How to cite:
    Karimi, M. (2020). Neglected Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Sickle Cell Anaemia during Prenatal Care. European Journal of Case Reports in Internal Medicine, 7(6). https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.12890/2020_001532