Bilateral Third Nerve Palsy in Mirror Aneurysms of the Posterior Communicating Arteries

  • Enrique Gomez-Figueroa Vascular Neurology Department, Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Omar Cardenas-Saenz Vascular Neurology Department, Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Gerardo Quiñones-Pesqueira Vascular Neurology Department, Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Roberto Cervantes-Uribe Vascular Neurology Department, Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Juan Manuel Calleja-Castillo Vascular Neurology Department, Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia, Mexico City, Mexico

Keywords

Third nerve palsy, oculomotor nerve palsy, subarachnoid hemorrhage, mirror aneurysm, thunderclap headache

Abstract

Background: Bilateral third cranial nerve palsy has only been reported in a handful of conditions including some with inflammatory, tumoural and vascular causes. An urgent imaging study is mandatory to rule out vascular aetiology, mainly aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH).
Case presentation: A 28-year-old Hispanic woman presented to the emergency department with a 21-day history of a sudden-onset and severe headache that on three occasions was accompanied by transient loss of awareness, the last episode occurring a week previously. The simple CT image showed minimal bleeding at the level of the perimesencephalic cisterns, with evidence of SAH. An angioCT revealed a 5×6 mm bilobed saccular aneurysm of the right posterior communicating artery and a 2×2 mm saccular aneurysm in the posterior left communicating artery.
Conclusions: A mirror aneurysm is found in 2–25% of aSAH cases. To date there is no consensus about the optimal management of patients with these findings.

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  • Published: 2018-06-28

    Issue: LATEST ONLINE (view)

    Section: Articles

    How to cite:
    Gomez-Figueroa, E., Cardenas-Saenz, O., Quiñones-Pesqueira, G., Cervantes-Uribe, R., & Calleja-Castillo, J. M. (2018). Bilateral Third Nerve Palsy in Mirror Aneurysms of the Posterior Communicating Arteries. European Journal of Case Reports in Internal Medicine, 2. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.12890/2018_000912