Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome Associated with Infundibular Dilation

  • Héctor Montenegro-Rosales Medica Sur Hospital, Magnetic Resonance Imaging Department, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Blanca Karina González-Alonso Medica Sur Hospital, Magnetic Resonance Imaging Department, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Omar Cárdenas-Sáenz ISSSTE Zaragoza, Neurology Department, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Alonso Gutierrez-Romero Medica Sur Hospital, Neurology Department, Mexico City, Mexico

Keywords

Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, sudden-onset severe headache

Abstract

Background: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is defined as a clinical and radiological syndrome that comprises a group of disorders characterized by sudden-onset severe headache and segmental vasoconstriction of the cerebral arteries with resolution within 3 months.
Case presentation: A 51-year-old female patient with a 2-week history of sudden-onset severe headache, visual disturbances and cerebellum; no relevant imaging findings, except for an infundibular dilation at the origin of the posterior communicating artery, and so, angiography was performed. When symptoms persisted, a new imaging study was carried out with findings of RCVS as the cause of the symptoms from the beginning.
Conclusions: Findings of RCVS can be obtained in various vasculopathies of the nervous system and vasculitis, being misdiagnosed, and so, clinical suspicion is essential; if vasoconstriction is not demonstrated on the initial image and other diagnoses have been excluded, the patient should be managed as having possible or probable RCVS.

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Published: 2020-08-31

Issue: Vol 7 No 11 (view)

Section: Articles

How to cite:
1.
Montenegro-Rosales H, González-Alonso BK, Cárdenas-Sáenz O, Gutierrez-Romero A. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome Associated with Infundibular Dilation. EJCRIM 2020;7 doi:10.12890/2020_001839.

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